Articles & Chapters

Journal Articles

(asterisks indicate refereed publications; sole-authored unless otherwise indicated)

*Slingerland, Edward, Ryan Nichols, Kristoffer Nielbo and Carson Logan. “The Distant Reading of Religious Texts: A “Big Data” Approach to Mind-Body Concepts in Early China” (accepted and in production, Journal of the American Academy of Religion)

* “Big Gods, Historical Explanation, and Bringing Religious Studies Out of the Intellectual Ghetto,Religion (September 2015).

* Slingerland, Edward and Brenton Sullivan. “Durkheim With Data: The Database of Religious History (DRH),Journal of the American Academy of Religion (in press).

Norenzayan, Ara, Azim Shariff, Aiyana Willard, Edward Slingerland, Will Gervais, Rita McNamara and Joseph Henrich. “Parochial Prosocial Religions: Historical and Contemporary Evidence for a Cultural Evolutionary Process.Behavioral and Brain Sciences (2016).

* Norenzayan, Ara, Azim Shariff, Aiyana Willard, Edward Slingerland, Will Gervais, Rita McNamara and Joseph Henrich. “The Cultural Evolution of Prosocial Religions,” Behavioral and Brain Sciences (accepted November 2014, forthcoming target article 2015).

* “Crafting Bowls, Cultivating Sprouts: Unavoidable Tensions in Early Chinese Confucianism,” Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14.2: 211-218.

* Hruschka, Daniel, Charles Efferson, Ting Jiang, Ashlan Falletta-Cowden, Sveinn Sigurdsson, Rita McNamara, Madeline Sands, Shirajum Munira, Edward Slingerland and Joseph Henrich. “Impartial Institutions, Pathogen Stress and the Expanding Social Network” (12 manuscript pages), Human Nature (October 2014)

* “Toward a Second Wave of Consilience in the Cognitive Scientific Study of Religion” (13 manuscript pages), Journal for Cognitive Historiography 1.1 (in press).

* “Body and Mind in Early China: An Integrated Humanities-Science Approach,” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 81.1: 6-55 (March 2013).

JAAR #43 most-read article as of August 2016

Portions to be reprinted in “China as the Radical “Other”: Lessons for the Cognitive Science of Religion,” in Is Religion Natural? The Chinese Challenge, ed. Ryan Hornbeck, Elizabeth Seiver and Justin Barrett (Forthcoming)

Modified version reprinted as “Interdisciplinary Methods in Chinese Philosophy: Comparative Philosophy and the Case Example of Mind- Body Holism,” in Research Handbook on Methodology in Chinese Philosophy, ed. Sor Hoon Tan, pp. 323-351. London: Bloomsbury (2016).

Turchin, Peter, Harvey Whitehouse, Pieter François, Edward Slingerland and Mark Collard. “A Historical Database of Sociocultural Evolution.” Cliodynamics: The Journal of Theoretical and Mathematical History 3: 271–293 (December 2012).

* Bulbulia, Joseph and Edward Slingerland. “Religious Studies as a Life Science,” Numen 59.5: 564–613 (2012).

“Back to the Future: A Response to Martin and Wiebe,” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 80.3: 611-617 (2012).

* “邁向經驗上可信賴的論理學:認知科學,德性論理,與中國早期思想德‘不費力注意’” [A re-refereed and updated version of a 2010 book chapter, “Toward an Empirically Responsible Ethics: Cognitive Science, Virtue Ethics, and Effortless Attention in Early Chinese Thought,” translated by 马鼎当 into Chinese], 中國哲學與文化 [The Journal of Chinese Philosophy and Culture] 9: 35-75 (May 2012).

* Slingerland, Edward and Maciej Chudek. “The Challenges of Qualitatively Coding Ancient Texts,” Cognitive Science 36.2: 183-186 (March 2012).

* Slingerland, Edward and Joseph Bulbulia. “Evolutionary Cognitive Science and the Study of Religion,” Religion 41.3: 307-328 (September 2011).

* Reber, Rolf and Edward Slingerland. “Confucius Meets Cognition: New Answers to Old Questions,” Religion, Brain and Behaviour 1.2: 135-145 (June 2011).

* Slingerland, Edward and Maciej Chudek. “The Prevalence of Folk Dualism in Early China,” Cognitive Science 35: 997-1007 (Summer 2011).

* “The Situationist Critique and Early Confucian Virtue Ethics,” Ethics 121.2 (January 2011): 390-419.

Selected as a target article for discussion on the Philosophy blog “Pea Soup”

Revised and reprinted in Cultivating VirtuePerspectives From Psychology, Theology and Philosophy (ed. Nancy Snow), 135-170. New York: Oxford University Press, 2015.

* “Metaphor and Meaning in Early China,” Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10.1 (Winter 2011): 1-30.

Winner: Dao, Annual Best Essay Award (2012)
Followed by “Reply to Prof. Moeller’s Response,” Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10.4 (Fall 2011): 537-539.
Topic of panel discussion, American Philosophical Association, Eastern Division, December 2012
Chinese translation by Bao Yongling 鮑永玲 to be published in《中西哲學論衡》[Comparative Philosophy: China and West], Vol 3 (2014), Shanghai: Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences.

* “‘Of What Use Are the Odes?’ Cognitive Science, Virtue Ethics, and Early Confucian Ethics,” Philosophy East & West 61.1 (January 2011): 80-109.

Reprinted in New Directions in Chinese Philosophy (ed. Cheng Chung-yi and Cheung Chan-fai), Chinese University of Hong Kong Press, 2014, pp. 69-102.

Chinese translation by Ai Chenyi 艾宸伊, “誦《詩》三百,亦奚以為?身體性的思維和早期儒家的修身”, published in 中國儒學 [Chinese Confucian Studies] 10, October 2015,  212-243

“Good and Bad Reductionism: Acknowledging the Power of Culture,” invited response to Joseph Carroll target article, “An Evolutionary Paradigm for Literary Study”, Style 42.2-3 (Summer/Fall 2008): 266-271.

* “The Problem of Moral Spontaneity in the Guodian Corpus,” Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7.3 (Fall 2008): 237-256.

* “Who’s Afraid of Reductionism? The Study of Religion in the Age of Cognitive Science,” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 76.2 (June 2008): 375-411.

Accompanied by “Reply to Cho & Squier” (418-419) and “Response to Cho & Squier” (449-454).
As of December 2012, this article was listed by JAAR as its #1 most cited article

“Distinguishing the Perspective of Religious Insider From That of Academic Outsider: A Response to ‘評斯林格蘭對《老子》無為之詮釋’ [‘A Critique of Slingerland’s Interpretation of Wu-wei in the Laozi’],” 中國哲學與文化 (The Journal of Chinese Philosophy and Culture) 1 (April 2007): 321-326.

* Slingerland, Edward, Eric Blanchard and Lyn Boyd-Judson. “Collision with China: Conceptual Metaphor Analysis, Somatic Marking, and the EP-3 Incident,” International Studies Quarterly 51.1 (March 2007): 53-77.

* “Conceptual Blending, Somatic Marking, and Normativity: A Case Example from Ancient Chinese,” Cognitive Linguistics 16.3 (September 2005): 557-584.

* “Conceptions of the Self in the Zhuangzi: Conceptual Metaphor Analysis and Comparative Thought,” Philosophy East & West 54.3 (July 2004): 322-342.

Reprinted in Figuring Religions: Comparing Ideas, Images, and Activities, ed. Shubha Pathak, 63-89. Albany, NY: SUNY Press (2013).

* “Conceptual Metaphor Theory as Methodology for Comparative Religion,” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 72.1 (March 2004): 1-31.

To be reprinted in Religious Language, Metaphor and the Mind, ed. Monika Kopytowska and Paul Chilton, Oxford: Oxford University Press (in preparation).

* “Virtue Ethics, the Analects, and the Problem of Commensurability,” Journal of Religious Ethics 29.1 (Summer 2001): 97-125.

To be reprinted in Confucian Studies: Critical Concepts, ed. Yao Xinzhong and Tu Weiming, Routledge 2013.

* “Effortless Action: the Chinese Spiritual Ideal of Wu-wei,” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 68.2 (June 2000): 293-328.

* “The Conception of Ming [“Fate”] in Early Chinese Thought,” Philosophy East and West 46.4 (1996): 567-581.

Book Chapters

* “China as the Radical “Other”: Lessons for the Cognitive Science of Religion,” in Is Religion Natural? The Chinese Challenge, ed. Ryan Hornbeck, Elizabeth Seiver and Justin Barrett (Under Review).

* Nichols, Ryan, Carson Logan and Edward Slingerland. “Supernatural Agents and Morality in a Large Corpus of Historically Important Chinese Texts: Directed Exploration as a New Method in Humanities,” in Is Religion Natural? The Chinese Challenge, ed. Ryan Hornbeck, Elizabeth Seiver and Justin Barrett (Under Review).

“Scientific Morality,” in This Idea Must Die: Scientific Theories That Are Blocking Progress, ed. John Brockman, 365-368. New York: Harper (2015).

* Slingerland, Edward, Joseph Henrich and Ara Norenzayan. “The Evolution of Prosocial Religions,” in Cultural Evolution: Strüngmann Forum Reports, Vol. 12, ed. Peter Richerson and Morton Christiansen. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press (in press).

* Norenzayan, Ara, Joseph Henrich and Edward Slingerland. “Religious Prosociality: A Synthesis,” in Cultural Evolution: Strüngmann Forum Reports, Vol. 12, ed. Peter Richerson and Morton Christiansen. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press (in press).

* Bulbulia, Joseph, Armin Geertz, Quentin Atkinson, Emma Cohen, Joseph Henrich, Ara Norenzayan, Edward Slingerland, Harvey Whitehouse, Thomas Widlok and David Sloan Wilson. “The Cultural Evolution of Religion: Group Report 4,” in Cultural Evolution: Strüngmann Forum Reports, Vol. 12, ed. Peter Richerson and Morton Christiansen. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press (in press).

* “Cognitive Science and Religious Thought: The Case of Psychological Interiority in the Analects,” in Mental Culture: Classical Social Theory and the Cognitive Science of Religion, ed. Dimitris Xygalatas and Lee McCorkle. London: Acumen Publishing, Religion, Cognition and Culture Series (forthcoming August 2013).

* Slingerland, Edward and Mark Collard. “Creating Consilience: Toward a Second Wave,” in Creating Consilience, Integrating the Sciences and the Humanities, ed. Edward Slingerland and Mark Collard, 3-40. New York: Oxford University Press (2012).

* “Mind-Body Dualism and the Two Cultures,” in Creating Consilience, Integrating the Sciences and the Humanities, ed. Edward Slingerland and Mark Collard, 74-87. New York: Oxford University Press (2012).

* “Toward an Empirically Responsible Ethics: Cognitive Science, Virtue Ethics, and Effortless Attention in Early Chinese Thought,” in Effortless Attention: A New Perspective in the Cognitive Science of Attention and Action, ed. Brian Bruya, 247-286. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press (2010).

“Neuroscience, Theory of Mind and the Status of Human-Level Truth,” in Neuroscience and Religion: Brain, Mind, Self and Soul, ed. Volney Gay, 67-108. New York: Lexington Books, 2009.

“Consilience and the Status of Human Level Truth,” in A Vision of Transdisciplinarity; Laying Foundations for a World Knowledge Dialogue, ed. Frédéric Darbellay, Moira Cockell, Jérôme Billotte and Francis Waldvogel, 51-60. Lausanne, Switzerland: EPFL Press, 2008.

“Classical Confucianism (I): Confucius and the Lun-Yü.” In Routledge History of Chinese Philosophy, ed. Bo Mou, 107-136. London: Routledge, 2008.

“Crafts and Virtues: the Paradox of Wu-wei in the Analects.” In Confucius Now: Contemporary Encounters with Confucius, ed. David Jones, 109-136. LaSalle, IL: Open Court Press, 2008.

“Images of Women in the Analects of Confucius.” In Images of Women in Chinese Thought and Culture, ed. Robin Wang, New York: Hackett Publishing Company, 2003: 62-67.

Annotated translation of and introduction to selections from the Analects (with critical bibliography), in Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy, ed. P.J. Ivanhoe and Bryan Van Norden, Seven Bridges Press (August 2000): 1-53.

Evolution of Religion / Cognitive Science of Religion

Big Gods, Historical Explanation, and Bringing Religious Studies Out of the Intellectual Ghetto,” Religion (September 2015).

Slingerland, Edward and Brenton Sullivan. “Durkheim With Data: The Database of Religious History (DRH),Journal of the American Academy of Religion (in press).

Norenzayan, Ara, Azim Shariff, Aiyana Willard, Edward Slingerland, Will Gervais, Rita McNamara and Joseph Henrich. “Parochial Prosocial Religions: Historical and Contemporary Evidence for a Cultural Evolutionary Process.Behavioral and Brain Sciences (2016).

“China as the Radical “Other”: Lessons for the Cognitive Science of Religion,” in Is Religion Natural? The Chinese Challenge, ed. Ryan Hornbeck, Elizabeth Seiver and Justin Barrett (Under Review).

Nichols, Ryan, Carson Logan and Edward Slingerland. “Supernatural Agents and Morality in a Large Corpus of Historically Important Chinese Texts: Directed Exploration as a New Method in Humanities,” in Is Religion Natural? The Chinese Challenge, ed. Ryan Hornbeck, Elizabeth Seiver and Justin Barrett (Under Review).

Norenzayan, Ara, Azim Shariff, Will Gervais, Aiyana Willard, Rita McNamara, Edward Slingerland, and Joseph Henrich. “The Cultural Evolution of Prosocial Religions,” Behavioral and Brain Sciences (accepted November 2014, forthcoming target article 2015).

Toward a Second Wave of Consilience in the Cognitive Scientific Study of Religion,” Journal for Cognitive Historiography 1.1: 121-130 (2013).

Slingerland, Edward, Joseph Henrich and Ara Norenzayan. “The Evolution of Prosocial Religions,” in Cultural Evolution: Strüngmann Forum Reports, Vol. 12, ed. Peter Richerson and Morton Christiansen, 335-348. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press (2013).

Norenzayan, Ara, Joseph Henrich and Edward Slingerland. “Religious Prosociality: A Synthesis,” in Cultural Evolution: Strüngmann Forum Reports, Vol. 12, ed. Peter Richerson and Morton Christiansen, 365-379. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press (2013).

Bulbulia, Joseph, Armin Geertz, Quentin Atkinson, Emma Cohen, Joseph Henrich, Ara Norenzayan, Edward Slingerland, Harvey Whitehouse, Thomas Widlok and David Sloan Wilson. “The Cultural Evolution of Religion: Group Report 4,” in Cultural Evolution: Strüngmann Forum Reports, Vol. 12, ed. Peter Richerson and Morton Christiansen, 381-404. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press (2013).

The above three book chapters are the product of a week-long Ernst Strüngmann Forum on “Cultural Evolution” held in Frankfurt in May-June 2012

http://www.esforum.de
https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/cultural-evolution

“Data from Dead Minds: Toward a ‘Second Wave’ of Consilience in the Scientific Study of Religion,” in History of Religions in Graeco-Roman Antiquity and the Cognitive Science of Religion, ed. Roger Beck and Luther Martin. London: Equinox Press, Cognitive, Religion and Culture Series (forthcoming).

“Cognitive Science and Religious Thought: The Case of Psychological Interiority in the Analects,” in Mental Culture: Towards a Cognitive Science of Religion, ed. Dimitris Xygalatas and Lee McCorkle, 197-212. London: Acumen Publishing, Religion, Cognition and Culture Series (2013).

Turchin, Peter, Harvey Whitehouse, Pieter François, Edward Slingerland, and Mark Collard. “A Historical Database of Sociocultural Evolution.” Cliodynamics: The Journal of Theoretical and Mathematical History 3: 271–293 (December 2012).

This article describes the rationale for our major new database initiative.

Bulbulia, Joseph and Edward Slingerland. “Religious Studies as a Life Science,” Numen 59.5: 564–613 (2012).

“Back to the Future: A Response to Martin and Wiebe,Journal of the American Academy of Religion 80.3: 611-617 (2012).

This is a response to a relatively pessimistic assessment of the potential for a truly scientific approach to the study of religion by Luther Martin and Donald Wiebe; the entire conversation is available on the JAAR site.

Slingerland, Edward and Joseph Bulbulia. “Evolutionary Cognitive Science and the Study of Religion,” Religion 41.3: 307-328 (September 2011).

“Who’s Afraid of Reductionism? The Study of Religion in the Age of Cognitive Science,” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 76.2 (June 2008): 375-411.

Accompanied by “Reply to Cho & Squier” (418-419) and “Response to Cho & Squier” (449-454).

As of December 2012, this article was listed by JAAR as its #1 most cited article.

Integration of the Humanities and the Sciences

Slingerland, Edward and Mark Collard. “Creating Consilience: Toward a Second Wave,” in Creating Consilience, Integrating the Sciences and the Humanities, ed. Edward Slingerland and Mark Collard, 3-40. New York: Oxford University Press (2012).

This introduction to the volume significantly updates the position laid out in my 2008 book What Science Offers the Humanities, emphasizing more the bidirectional nature of science-humanities integration.

“Mind-Body Dualism and the Two Cultures,” in Creating Consilience, Integrating the Sciences and the Humanities, ed. Edward Slingerland and Mark Collard, 74-87. New York: Oxford University Press (2012).

“Neuroscience, Theory of Mind and the Status of Human-Level Truth,” in Neuroscience and Religion: Brain, Mind, Self and Soul, ed. Volney Gay, 67-108. New York: Lexington Books, 2009.

“Good and Bad Reductionism: Acknowledging the Power of Culture,” invited response to Joseph Carroll target article, “An Evolutionary Paradigm for Literary Study”, Style 42.2-3 (Summer/Fall 2008): 266-271.

“Consilience and the Status of Human Level Truth,” in A Vision of Transdisciplinarity; Laying Foundations for a World Knowledge Dialogue, ed. Frédéric Darbellay, Moira Cockell, Jérôme Billotte and Francis Waldvogel, 51-60. Lausanne, Switzerland: EPFL Press, 2008.

Theory of Mind and Mind-Body Folk Dualism

Slingerland, Edward, Ryan Nichols, Kristoffer Nielbo and Carson Logan. “The Distant Reading of Religious Texts: A “Big Data” Approach to Mind-Body Concepts in Early China” (accepted and in production, Journal of the American Academy of Religion)

“Body and mind in early China: An integrated humanities-science approach.” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 81 (1): 6-55 (March 2013).

JAAR #43 most-read article as of August 2016

Portions to be reprinted in “China as the Radical “Other”: Lessons for the Cognitive Science of Religion,” in Is Religion Natural? The Chinese Challenge, ed. Ryan Hornbeck, Elizabeth Seiver and Justin Barrett (Forthcoming)

Modified version reprinted as “Interdisciplinary Methods in Chinese Philosophy: Comparative Philosophy and the Case Example of Mind- Body Holism,” in Research Handbook on Methodology in Chinese Philosophy, ed. Sor Hoon Tan, pp. 323-351. London: Bloomsbury (2016).

Slingerland, Edward and Maciej Chudek. “The Challenges of Qualitatively Coding Ancient Texts,” Cognitive Science 36.2: 183-186 (March 2012).

Slingerland, Edward and Maciej Chudek. “The Prevalence of Folk Dualism in Early China,” Cognitive Science 35: 997-1007 (Summer 2011).

A report of a new technique for performing large-scale qualitative analysis of historical texts, with response to critics.

Virtue Ethics and Cognitive Science

“邁向經驗上可信賴的論理學:認知科學,德性論理,與中國早期思想德‘不費力注意’” [A re-refereed and updated version of a 2010 book chapter, “Toward an Empirically Responsible Ethics: Cognitive Science, Virtue Ethics, and Effortless Attention in Early Chinese Thought,” translated by 马鼎当 into Chinese], 中國哲學與文化 [The Journal of Chinese Philosophy and Culture] 9: 35-75 (May 2012).

“The Situationist Critique and Early Confucian Virtue Ethics,Ethics 121.2(January 2011): 390-419.

Selected as a target article for discussion on the Philosophy blog “Pea Soup”: http://peasoup.typepad.com/

Revised and reprinted in Cultivating VirtuePerspectives From Psychology, Theology and Philosophy (ed. Nancy Snow), 135-170. New York: Oxford University Press, 2015.

“‘Of What Use Are the Odes?’ Cognitive Science, Virtue Ethics, and Early Confucian Ethics,Philosophy East & West 61.1 (January 2011): 80-109.

Reprinted in New Directions in Chinese Philosophy (ed. Cheng Chung-yi and Cheung Chan-fai), Chinese University of Hong Kong Press, 2014, pp. 69-102.

Chinese translation by Ai Chenyi 艾宸伊, “誦《詩》三百,亦奚以為?身體性的思維和早期儒家的修身”, published in 中國儒學 [Chinese Confucian Studies] 10, October 2015,  212-243

“Toward an Empirically Responsible Ethics: Cognitive Science, Virtue Ethics, and Effortless Attention in Early Chinese Thought,” in Effortless Attention: A New Perspective in the Cognitive Science of Attention and Action, ed. Brian Bruya, 247-286. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press (2010).

The above three articles/chapters roughly represent the scope of my projected monograph project on virtue ethics and cognitive science, to be started in late 2014.

“Virtue Ethics, the Analects, and the Problem of Commensurability,” Journal of Religious Ethics 29.1 (Summer 2001): 97-125.

To be reprinted in Confucian Studies: Critical Concepts, ed. Yao Xinzhong and Tu Weiming, Routledge 2013.

Effortless Action or wu-wei

Reber, Rolf and Edward Slingerland. “Confucius Meets Cognition: New Answers to Old Questions,” Religion, Brain and Behaviour 1.2: 135-145 (June 2011).

Co-authored piece with a cognitive psychologist exploring how recent work in psychology bears upon the paradox of wu-wei in the Analects.

“The Problem of Moral Spontaneity in the Guodian Corpus,” Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7.3 (Fall 2008): 237-256.

An updated statement of themes explore in my 2003 Effortless Action, exploring new evidence from a corpus of archeological texts.

“Crafts and Virtues: the Paradox of Wu-wei in the Analects.” In Confucius Now: Contemporary Encounters with Confucius, ed. David Jones, 109-136. LaSalle, IL: Open Court Press, 2008.

“Effortless Action: the Chinese Spiritual Ideal of Wu-wei,” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 68.2 (June 2000): 293-328.

Article version of my dissertation project.

Cognitive Linguistics / Metaphor and Blending Theory

“Metaphor and Meaning in Early China,” Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10.1 (Winter 2011): 1-30.

Winner: Dao, Annual Best Essay Award (2012)
Followed by “Reply to Prof. Moeller’s Response,” Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10.4 (Fall 2011): 537-539.
Topic of panel discussion, American Philosophical Association, Eastern Division, December 2012
Chinese translation by Bao Yongling 鮑永玲 to be published in《中西哲學論衡》[Comparative Philosophy: China and West], Vol 3 (2014), Shanghai: Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences.

* Slingerland, Edward, Eric Blanchard and Lyn Boyd-Judson. “Collision with China: Conceptual Metaphor Analysis, Somatic Marking, and the EP-3 Incident,” International Studies Quarterly 51.1 (March 2007): 53-77.

Attempt to perform metaphor analysis of political rhetoric on a large scale in both Chinese and English.

* “Conceptual Blending, Somatic Marking, and Normativity: A Case Example from Ancient Chinese,” Cognitive Linguistics 16.3 (September 2005): 557-584.

Brings together conceptual blending theory and Antonio Damasio’s concept of somatic marking.

* “Conceptions of the Self in the Zhuangzi: Conceptual Metaphor Analysis and Comparative Thought,”Philosophy East & West 54.3 (July 2004): 322-342.

To be reprinted in Figuring Religions: Comparing Ideas, Images, and Activities, ed. Shubha Pathak, Albany, NY: SUNY Press, forthcoming.

* “Conceptual Metaphor Theory as Methodology for Comparative Religion,” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 72.1 (March 2004): 1-31.

Argues for embodied experience as the inter-cultural bridge that makes comparative work possible.

Early Chinese Thought

Crafting Bowls, Cultivating Sprouts: Unavoidable Tensions in Early Chinese Confucianism,” Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14.2: 211-218.

“Classical Confucianism (I): Confucius and the Lun-Yü.” In Routledge History of Chinese Philosophy, ed. Bo Mou, 107-136. London: Routledge, 2008.

Feature Reviews

“Chinese Thought from an Evolutionary Perspective, a review of Donald Munro,” A Chinese Ethics for the New Century: The Ch’ien Mu Lectures in History and Culture, and Other Essays on Science and Confucian Ethics. Philosophy East & West 57.3: 375-388.

“Why Philosophy Is Not ‘Extra’ In Understanding the Analects, a review of Brooks and Brooks,” The Original Analects, Philosophy East & West 50:1 (January 2000): 137-141, 146-147

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